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{celebrate} this week

I'm here to {celebrate} with Ruth Ayres and YOU!
Finding the little moments of joy in life.



{Today I am celebrating.}

{saturday}
It's Saturday!  After the first week back to school after spring break, this week felt busy.  So, today, in our house we enjoy a day without constant going and interruptions.  The first question I heard this morning was: "Do we get to stay home today?" We celebrate today ~ Saturday ~ Ourday. 

{writing} 
I enjoyed my fourth year of participating in the TWT March Slice of Life Story Challenge.  I wrote for thirty-one days in March, plus five more days of continued writing (counting today)!  I had no real intentions of continuing to write each day, but the writing habit has been created.  I feel the need to write each day.  I also know the connections and comments fuel that writing.  I'll see how life and time transitions during this writing season.

{five minute friday}
Ruth introduced me to another writing challenge: Five Minute Friday.  Yesterday, I wrote for five minutes (maybe a couple more) on the prompt word - fitting for the end of this week: {writer}.  No editing, no worries, just write and publish.  Then link up on Lisa-Jo Baker's website and leave a comment for the person who linked up before you.  

{daily celebrations}
At dinnertime I am always trying to encourage the girls to tell us about their day at school.  Sometimes I feel totally ignored.  So, this week, I remembered a little discussion starter that good friends used when their children were younger: one good, one bad.  We go around the table and tell one good thing that happened and one bad thing.  The girls have bought into this!  They celebrate seeing their preschool teacher or all their friends being at school or playing a special game.  They share their disappointments about a friend being sick or getting hurt at school or not having preschool.  They quickly think of one good and one bad and leads to further conversations.  

Me?  I have struggled!  I'm tired at the end of the day and thankful to be sitting with my family, eating a meal together, and reconnecting after a long day.  I'm having a hard time thinking of one good, one bad.  I think these conversations and reflections will help us learn to {celebrate} more!

{one good}
I'm writing yet again and celebrating with you!  Also, thankful that Ruth mentioned my little post about celebrating my birthday last week by finding the joy in the ordinary.  That's my "one good" for me today.  

Comments

  1. Your writing falls into the "good" category, every time you post your words. I study your poetry and try to figure out how I can write like you. Your words have a flow that caches me every time. Glad you are celebrating today. :-)

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  2. We used to do the "one thorn, one rose" at the dinner table, too, Michelle - it was always such a great way to share our days and learn about each others' - which is exactly what you say, too.

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  3. We often do this at the dinner table - as the kids have grown, we have thrown out other kinds of questions One thing you were proud of today? One thing that was harder than you expected? Something you learned? Favourite small moment? Great habits to teach both sharing and listening. Happy belated birthday!

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  4. Lots to celebrate again this week! One good - we went to Branson to see Jonah yesterday - one bad, my bad cholesterol was high. Have a great day! Love ya, Mom

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  5. I always love your writing, whether it's poetry or your celebrations. Your joyfulness abounds. And i love that you kept writing after March!

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  6. It's always a joy to read your celebrations!
    I'm so glad you are still writing...Missing the daily SOL!

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  7. You can celebrate every day when you share words on your blog. It is easier (not plain easy) to form habits than to keep them going. Not breaking them takes inner strength.

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