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{sols} solo shopping


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These days I never make the time to shop.  With two four year olds, slow-pace-easy-shopping is rare.  Let's just say I do plenty of online shopping.

However, today the girls and I took the fifteen minute drive to our local IKEA.  The girls have been asking to go to the play land.  Every time we shop at IKEA (again, rare), there is a long line of kids waiting.  We end up shopping together as a family.  Well, the quick version due to endless whining, "I wanna go home!" 

I thought we'd try visiting during the week when maybe it wasn't as busy.  We were sort of right: there was a wait to get into the play land, but only 15 minutes.  We sat.  We waited. We people watched.  And then finally the girls' names were called.  Shoes kicked off.  Kisses on the cheek goodbye.  And they were off and playing.

It felt strange leaving them, but I turned around acting like all was okay.   I was on the search for a few baskets, picture frames, and a lamp.  I walked away reminding myself that I n-e-v-e-r shop by myself, enjoy it.

Except, I didn't know what to do.  I wandered endlessly in this large store.  Usually, I'm eyeing cute (or practical) items for home or for school.  Filling my cart with stuff that I don't really need as my hubby rolls his eyes.

Not today. Nothing caught my eye.  Nothing stopped me for another look.  Nothing placed in my cart.

Instead, I continuously checked the time on my phone.  Waiting for my free hour to be up.  And I realized that I forgot how to solo shop. (My hubby was happy with the free shopping trip.)

Comments

  1. When things change, it's rather upside down, isn't it? You're so used to the one way, hurry, grab, make a decision, that you've forgotten the leisure. IKEA is fun to go to with my older grandson, at 11 or so, but he likes to eat at the restaurant, and look at all the gadgets. I am in awe of how large it is-amazing. Good luck finding the leisure time, Michelle!

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  2. I'm a twin Mom too. Of now eleven year olds. I so relate. :-)

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  3. I'm thinking that maybe you need more practice of "solo" shopping - maybe when I'm visiting! I'm sure the girls had a great time playing and waiting for your return. At least you had could browse, but I don't know how nothing jumped into your basket. Love ya, Mom

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  4. Perhaps next time you will feel more comfortable shopping by yourself. I am sure your girls liked playing there and you got a few extra steps that day:)

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  5. It's kind of nice just to have a chance to browse alone. I'm sure your shopping muscle memory will return when you have more opportunities to practice. :-)

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  6. "Nothing" is good sometimes.

    And I was just thinking that maybe "Someone" wanted you in that place for an hour...

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