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{sols} old but new


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I picked up the girls after school.  I asked them about their day, but P. only wanted to know one thing.

"Mommy, did you wash the clothes?"

I know exactly what clothes she is talking about.  The hand-me-down clothes the girls picked out from friends from our old church.  They generously shared two large boxes of clothes in just-the-right-size for the girls.  The other night, after the girls were in bed, I dumped out the boxes and scanned the possibilities.

Most of the articles of clothing were not my style for the girls.  In addition, my girls are currently on a "let's dress alike" kick.  I wasn't buying two of everything.  I wanted them to have some choice. In our house, we said, "similar, but different."  Perhaps the same shirt, but one in pink and one in purple.  That's what I was going for, and then mornings came with tears.  Now, every morning (for more than two years), P. picks out her clothes and M. picks exactly the same thing.

There were no duplicates in the boxes.  So I picked out a couple items that I kind of liked or I thought were perfect to add to the dress up box and set them to the side.  Our friends mentioned that we could donate the clothes that we did not want.

The next day, the box was set to go for donation.  Until two little curious pairs of hands opened up the boxes.  The girls did their own shopping.  P. loved a colorful dress while M. picked out a cute skirt with sparkles.  The girls continued to pull out shirts, skirts, dresses, sandals until they filled a laundry basket with choices of their own liking.

And they were okay with different.  Maybe this is what I needed to help them be their own little person.  I was pleasantly surprised with the old hand-me-downs.

Today she wanted those "new" clothes.

"Oh, honey.  I was at school all day too.  I wasn't home to wash any laundry," I explained when M. jumped into the conversation.

"What do you think that Mommy's an octopus?"

I laughed out loud at her very smart comment.  And yes, some days I wish that I was an octopus!

"We can wash your new clothes tonight," I told them, imagining what I'd look like as an octopus and all that could get accomplished ...

 

Comments

  1. At least one extra pair of hands would help! Leave it to M to come up with the correct comment! They are each their own individual (even if they dress alike). The time will come when they want to be just the opposite (and then borrow their sis's clothes). Love ya, Mom

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  2. Sounds like the girls are starting to come into their own. It will be interesting to see how their tastes in all things change as the grow older.

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  3. It wouldn't have probably worked the same way had you asked them to pick the clothes. Their curiosity and own initiative helped them to choose and decide. The witty comment is a pearl.

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  4. That was the perfect response by M, lol. So much to do, not enough arms. The craziness is, even if we were to have eight appendages, we likely still would want more. Sweet slice.

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  5. Must be time to try something new for them! I'd like to be an octopus just so I could get more things done at the same time. I'd be finished with all my jobs at school in half the time! And think of the shoes! ;)

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  6. As for trying to find ways for them to dress differently, it seems your problem has been solved! Fun story. Kids are always surprising, aren't they?

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  7. Seems like they are ready to have their own voice --how fun! I love hand me downs -- I still get them from my sister! If you figure out the octopus thing --let me know -- I could use those arms!!!

    Clare

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  8. My gosh I could get so much more done if I had eight limbs!

    Glad they took the initiative to dress differently. I'm sure that made you happy.

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  10. So cute! "What do you think that Mommy's an octopus?"

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