Sunday, March 5, 2017

{ for you, @missamykr } 5/31 #sol17


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The March Slice of Life Story Challenge
hosted at the Two Writing Teachers.
Join us for a month of writing!
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Maybe you have heard. Maybe you haven't.

Yesterday morning I stopped by Katherine's blog at Read Write and Reflect.  She openly shared about the anxiety she holds as being a mom. It was sparked by the NY Times article You May Want to Marry My Husband by Amy Krouse Rosenthal. Yes, the AKR we all know and adore. Please read it. But be prepared. It's real and heartbreaking.

I read it with no realization of what I was actually reading. It still sits with me deep in my heart. Deep in my stomach. I thought about her all day.

I had a little free time while my girls attended a birthday party and ended up at a Barnes and Noble. I went straight for the children's book section. I picked up this little treasure ...


I cried. At the bookstore. Reading this kid's book. Because I wonder ... did she write this before her diagnosis? Did she write it after as a love letter to her children? I just can't imagine ... I'm crying again. Find this book. Please read it.  But be prepared. It's real and heartbreaking knowing more of Amy's story.

AKR is such an inspiration. A positive light in this world. All her homegrown projects. Her meetings at the Bean in Chicago. Her yellow umbrella. Her celebrations of life. Her humor. Her smile. Her books. Oh, her books. This morning I spotted Plant a Kiss on my dresser. We have read it hundreds of times dragging our fingers across the kiss. I will not read it the same. Ever.

Her words and stories mean so much and now they mean so much more. Carry so much more weight.

This little slice is dedicated to AKR, her husband, and her children, who understand and know the power of pure joy. My deepest prayers go out to Amy for strength and continued courage.

Shine on, Amy. Shine the only way you know how.



18 comments:

  1. I had read both - but do know the book you referenced. I am going to buy it now. Crying to hard to type much else -- thank your for continuing to spread her story. Shine on...
    Clare

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  2. Wow. I read her article in the NYT a few days ago and wept--and I'm not a crier. Doesn't this go to show the power of words and the power a wordsmith has in explaining the world? Sometimes, I think the most important people in the world are the ones who are able to explain the world through their writing.

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  3. I read her article yesterday and was just heartbroken. It has been on my mind ever since. The power of words. I had just ordered her book That's Me Loving You. I haven't read it yet. I am sure, after reading her article, it will have me in tears.

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  4. Your post makes me think of a dear friend. Your post makes me want to learn more about this Amy (they share the same first name). We all need to find the light in the darkness.

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  5. Honestly, I had never heard of Amy until I saw her piece in the New York Times. It devastated me to read her story. I can tell she is special. I'm going to get a few of her books from the library. Thanks for writing about Amy.

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  6. Reading that article took my breath away and broke my heart. After, I felt like I needed to live the life that Amy would like to. Thanks for this post. I think we all feel a deep connection to her.

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  7. I am so grateful I read your post. I judge it found its way to my screen. I need to buy this book today and start praying for Amy and her family. Tears...

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  8. I'm with you - still in tears anytime I think of this. I'm sharing her piece in the NY Times as a mentor text with my students this week. They know her books. I'm curious to see how they react.

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  9. Heart hurts. Sometimes life does not make sense.

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  10. I'm not familiar with her or her story. But your piece has me reflecting on my blessings, and on the important things in my life. We are all connected in this web. Thank you for writing about this.
    https://jet197.wordpress.com/2017/03/05/am-i-imprisoned

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  11. I read the NYT article a couple days ago, and as a woman in her 50s, I've been thinking about my own mortality and my ordinary life. I'm not as familiar w/ Kraus's children's books, but I love "Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life." Our mortality is something we all need to be aware of and use to life life fully.

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  12. What an extraordinary woman AKR is. I'm sure that I've read her books with the girls, but need to check them out at the library. She has a gift for writing and has made me think about how blessed I am to have a loving husband and family.

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  13. Oh, wow this is so emotional isn't it? I was a big teary mess last night. Thank you for letting us process.

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  14. My heart has been heavy ever since I read the NYT article. I was devastated by it. I am so sorry for her family and the world will miss her voice.

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  15. Two days after I read AKR's post for the first time, my eyes well up when I just think of it. I have not read That's Me Loving You, but when I do in the near future, I will also read it with different eyes. Thanks for making this post a tribute to this amazing lady who has accomplished so much.

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  16. I read AKR's letter during my lunch hour on Friday. And cried. Read it again yesterday. And cried. I love all of her books. My favorite AKR book is I WISH YOU MORE. I need to read THAT'S ME LOVING YOU. So, so sad.

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  17. Thank you for posting this. I read the NYT article a while ago and felt deeply moved by it. I agree that her stories mean so much.

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  18. Oh my heart. It has shaken me too.

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Thanks for sharing your thoughts.